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All of our upcoming events are listed below in date order. Click on an event title to learn more.

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Presenting Series Film, Television and Theatre Dept. of Music Shakespeare at ND
Sacred Music at ND Free Events Family Events Special Events


Wizard of Oz (1939)<h4> Summer Classics</h4>
 

While not initially a major financial success due to its large budget, The Wizard of Oz was a critical and cultural sensation when released in 1939 (losing the Best Picture Oscar to similarly-popular Gone with the Wind). Its multi-generational nostalgia solidified with its annual holiday telecasts, first on CBS and later NBC, where Dorothy (Judy Garland) became iconic and her journey well-known: a tornado hits her native Kansas and sends her and her little dog, too, to Oz. Once there, she befriends a brainless Scarecrow (Ray Bolger), a heartless Tin Man (Jack Haley), and a spineless Lion (Bert Lahr). The four follow the yellow brick road to meet the eponymous Wizard while battling the Wicked Witch of the West (née Elphaba).

Free for Notre Dame Students.

Co-presented with La Casa de Amistad and the South Bend Civic Theatre, which will be performing the stage version July 14–30.

Sponsored by the Meg and John P. Brogan Endowment for Classic Cinema.

Wed 7/5/17 7:00PM Browning Cinema


Rear Window (1954)<h4>Summer Classics</h4>
 

Alfred Hitchcock’s classic, a commentary on vicariousness and self-reflexively filmgoing, returns to the Browning Cinema. Laid up with a broken leg, professional photographer L.B. “Jeff” Jefferies (James Stewart) combats the cabin fever swelling about his midcentury New York apartment with some binoculars and voyeurism. Looking out his rear window to a shared courtyard, he becomes enthralled with the lives he follows, bringing in his girlfriend Lisa (Grace Kelly) into the peeping. When they suspect a potential murder (it is, after all, a Hitchcock movie) and the couple decides to crack the case, the once-giant gulf between the apartment and the courtyard quickly collapses as tension builds.

Free for Notre Dame Students.

Sponsored by the Meg and John P. Brogan Endowment for Classic Cinema. Co-presented by La Casa de Amistad.

Wed 7/12/17 7:00PM Browning Cinema


2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)<h4> Summer Classics</h4>
 

In the wake of Dr. Strangelove, Stanley Kubrick co-wrote a science fiction space epic alongside the author of the short story that inspired it, Sir Arthur C. Clarke. Released at the height of the Space Race, the film and, in particular, its visual effects garnered immediate popular and critical praise, which never waned. After the sun rises to the timpani of Also Sprach Zarathustra, a black monolith appears before a chattering tribe of ape-men and, through unspoken means, delivers them uppercase-T Technology. Millions of years later, the monolith is (re-)discovered by humans and soon a fleet of astronauts find themselves in conflict with their ship’s computer, HAL.

Free for Notre Dame Students.

Sponsored by the Meg and John P. Brogan Endowment for Classic Cinema. Co-presented by La Casa de Amistad.

Wed 7/19/17 7:00PM Browning Cinema


Chinatown (1974)<h4> Summer Classics</h4>
 

Chinatown ultimately became Roman Polanski’s last film to be shot in the United States and remains a classic depiction of Los Angeles, which is no short order. The neo-noir mystery follows fedora-wearing private investigator Jake Gittes (Jack Nicholson) as he picks up a seemingly routine infidelity case involving Mr. and Mrs. Mulwray. When Mr. Mulwray is snuffed out, the plot thickens as Jake noses around Depression-era Southern California.

Free for Notre Dame Studnets.

Sponsored by the Meg and John P. Brogan Endowment for Classic Cinema. Co-presented by La Casa de Amistad.

Wed 7/26/17 7:00PM Browning Cinema


E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial <h4>Summer Classics</h4>
 

Often credited with creating the summer blockbuster when he released Jaws, Stephen Spielberg’s largest hit came seven years later (and six years before Mac and Me) with this coming-of-age tale. Stuck on Earth, a docile alien is found and befriended by a lonely young boy named Elliott (Henry Thomas). E.T., as the alien is later named, returns to the suburbs where Elliott and his siblings, including his sister (Drew Barrymore), try to keep E.T. under wraps. Soon, however, governmental forces learn of the alien, creating a dire situation for both Elliott and E.T.

Sponsored by the Meg and John P. Brogan Endowment for Classic Cinema. Co-presented by La Casa de Amistad.

Wed 8/2/17 7:00PM Browning Cinema


Big (1988)
 <h4>Summer Classics</h4>

The late-80’s saw a slew of Freaky-Friday-but-with-dudes films, including Like Father Like Son (1987), Vice Versa (1988), and 18 Again! (1988). While those films were largely dismissed, Big (1988) hit at the same time and managed not to be clumped together with those clunkers, earning two Oscar nominations and making its budget back nearly tenfold. Unlike the previously mentioned body-switch movies, Big keeps it internal as 12-year-old Josh (David Moscow) alone magically ages after longing to be “big” and becomes 30-year-old Josh (Tom Hanks) overnight. Heading to New York City, the suddenly-aged Josh manages to secure employment and does his best to juggle the difficulties a career and romance throws his way while gaining an appreciation for childhood’s carefreeness.

Sponsored by the Meg and John P. Brogan Endowment for Classic Cinema. Co-presented by La Casa de Amistad.

Wed 8/9/17 7:00PM Browning Cinema